Introduction:

World War II saw most of the world’s populations on their feet, willing to provide for whichever country or moral cause they saw fit. Many common themes surrounding the following musical works — that of life, death, love, sorrow, remembrance — are all humanistic in nature. Some estimates say…


This past week was a chaotic one — I recently took up a job working as a production and logistics coordinator for a local, but professional choral ensemble. The first concert of their reduced season, instead of being their normal 18-part choir, was simply a soprano and collaborative pianist in…


As a parallel with my other points discussed in class discussing today’s limited performable repertoire in the orchestral field, this article by John von Rhein in the July 19, 1992 Chicago Tribune entitled, “American Voices: New CDs venture beyond tired symphonic programs” serves as a dual-purpose piece of (somewhat recent)…


In looking for articles written about the more controversial from last week’s discussions, Milton Babbitt, I stumbled across an October 17, 1982 article in the New York Times written by Joan Peyser entitled, “Milton Babbitt — Juggler of Strict Serialism and Pop: Milton Babbitt’s Serialism”. Needless to say, given our…


Why do we only hear the Masterworks? Why perform just a small sliver of all the amazing musical moments available to us, instead of taking the effort to promote something new? …


Note: I use the term “American Music” in its colloquial sense referring to the United States of America, as this is the way I interpret the discussed articles’ labeling of it. I am not sure if this term is written exclusively meaning the United States or The Americas, as the…


On December 25, 1949, the New York Times published an article written by Aaron Copland entitled “A Modernist Defends Modern Music: It’s dissonant and cerebral — but it’s still music, and closer to the past than you think it is.” I was initially drawn to this article due to the…


As our past historic-musical discussions and debates have shown us thus far, it is incredibly difficult to validate arguments based on information that was told to us through a repetitive series of undergraduate lectures. The purpose of examining primary sources is not necessarily to refute prior knowledge from our music…


In response to our class discussion this past Thursday, as well as in other past classes, I decided to look for evidence explaining the Arthur Honegger’s place within the early 20th Century’s French musical group, Les Six. This group famously included five French composers: Darius Milhaud, Francis Poulenc, Georges Auric…


Considering our recent discussion in class about Béla Bartók’s use of folk music for foundational material in many of his works, I figured some works by Aaron Copland could provide an interesting comparison, while also taking into consideration the ‘Americanized version’ of folk music’s influence. Aaron Copland composed Appalachian Spring

Daniel Sherman

A Bostonian in the desert. Talk to me about Music, Football, Hiking, Cooking, or anything else!

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